A letter to our Honorable Prime Minister

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A young Australian cricketer Phillip Hughes died on November 27 from the head injury he got from cricket ball on the field. Kabul was bombed once again. Pakistani actress Veena Malik Bollywood was sentenced to 26 years in prison on blasphemy charge.

We all Nepalese were glued to our television sets watching with pride our honorable Prime Minister –as the chairperson of the SAARC – sitting beside other executive heads of the SAARC countries in the podium. We watched treaties being signed and saw Modi and Sharif shaking hands.

The job was well done to decorate the Kathmandu Valley, and rightly so, to welcome the delegates. But, do we pull our socks right here and end?

No, Sir.

As a young breed of Nepal, I do not wait until the date for the promulgation of constitution by the Constituent Assembly (CA) crosses yet again to make my voice.

We were sad to have missed the first date of May 28, 2010. We were surprised when the CA was dissolved by the Supreme Court a year later, although we were most likely to miss another date anyway. Elections and new 601 CA members; and we sincerely hope 22 January is the deadline.

Time and again a new "superstar" emerges from a different party claiming the post of prime minister. We definitely do not lack leaders; all we lack is leadership.

I speak as one of the younger generation, which is referred to as the backbone of any country. We don’t blame His Excellency Sushil Koirala alone for the faults in Nepal’s politics surely. We all are a part of it.

We do realize that Nepal is in transition phase. A phase that began with royal family massacre in 2001, then the end of monarchy in 2008 to make way for a Federal Republic Nepal.

We do realize Nepal's journey has been tough. It had to lag behind by 10 years due to the decade-long conflict.

We do understand that even though revolution might occur late, no time is wrong time for it. 

But the face of ‘Naya Nepal’ is mostly a comic show. Haami sahmati ko prakriya ma chaun (We are in the process of forging consensus) has become the most comical statement ever conveyed to Nepalese. It is high time that the party’s interest didn’t contradict a nation’s interest.

We rightly agree with India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi's view: to frame a constitution not on the basis of majority but consensus. 

It has become clear now that India or any other country is not interfering in internal politics of Nepal. This is a plea from a young Nepali to Nepal's prime minister. You are the pen, we are the ink. What’s stopping you to write a country’s destiny?

Lighting up the capital was not an end but a beginning towards infrastructure development, implementing the power treaties, scaling the economies upwards, and to write the constitution on time. We wish that the morning of 23rd January, 2015 will not be the morning incompleteness and rage. Here is a tweet sized tale dedicated to you, Prime Minister:

Mats laid for namaz

Hands joined in prayer

Minds bent into silence

A bird sparkling to fly

 

For all of them,

The flight of hope is yet to take off

 

With hope,

A Nepali

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